CFP PostGraduate Social History of Medicine Conference Shanghai

CFP. SOCIETY FOR THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF MEDICINE POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE 2017

In cooperation with the University of Strathclyde and Shanghai University
Funded by the Wellcome Trust

Health Histories: The Next Generation
October 12-13, 2017
Shanghai University, China

https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/

The Society for the Social History of Medicine periodically hosts an international conference for postgraduate students. The 2017 conference committee welcomes papers on any topic within the discipline of the social history of medicine and particularly encourage proposals for papers and panels that critically examine or challenge some aspect of the history of medicine and health. We welcome a range of methodological approaches, geographical regions, and time periods.

Proposals should be based on new research from postgraduate students currently registered in a University programme. Paper submissions should include a 250-word abstract, including five key words and a short (1-page) CV. Panel submissions should feature three papers (each with a 250-word abstract, including five key words, and a short CV), a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract.

For postgraduate students not currently funded through an existing fellowship or grant, funding is available to cover the costs associated with visas, travel, and accommodation in Shanghai. Upon confirmation of an accepted abstract, each postgraduate student is required to apply for a visa to travel to China. For more information about visas, please see https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/china/entry-requirements.

All postgraduate delegates must register (or already be registered) as members of the Society for the Social History of Medicine. For more information about SSHM student membership, please see http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/sochis/access_purchase/price_list.html.

To propose an abstract, please visit:
https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/abstractsubmission/

To propose a panel, please visit:
https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/panelsubmission/

Submissions and queries should be sent to Mrs Caroline Marley: cshhh-admin@strath.ac.uk.

Conference Organizers:
Dr Stephen Mawdsley, University of Strathclyde
Professor Yong-an Zhang, Shanghai University

Abstract Deadline: 10 March 2017

 

For more information see: sshm.org

CFP: 19th Century Ireland

The following may be of interest to Historians of STEM subjects. The Society for the Study of Nineteenth-Century Ireland (SSNCI) fosters an inter-disciplinary approach to Nineteenth-Century Irish studies.

Figures of Authority in 19th-Century Ireland.

The 19th century is often seen as a period when age-old sources of social, political, spiritual and cultural authority were eroded by various crises, triggering searches for alternative forms of leadership. While such a diagnosis may certainly ring true for Victorian Britain and by extension for the neighbouring island, 19th-century Ireland also witnessed both the restoration of older forms of authority (e.g. the re-establishment of the Catholic hierarchy at a time when papal power was reinforced) and the rise of figures who defined new models of authority (e.g. Daniel O’Connell as a prototype for the charismatic politician in a democratic age). The struggle for the definition of the Irish nation empowered conflicting claims to public authority. New cultural and educational forces vied to assert authority on an increasingly literate population, while new media saw themselves as leaders of opinion and gradually helped fashion a cult of personality centered on public figures. Despite his notorious anti-Irish pronouncements, Thomas Carlyle’s views on hero-worship and on the nature of authority exerted an influence on generations of Irish intellectuals across sectarian and political divides. Romantic concepts of literary authorship prompted some to think of poets – both dead and living –as (un)acknowledged legislators, while in the scholarly sphere, new distinguished Societies emerged to enshrine intellectual authority. Social and economic changes entailed reconfigurations of  authority within age-old family structures. Various studies suggest that the waning of Ascendancy power did not automatically entail a corresponding decline in traditional deference, while others have shown how existing public offices could be reinvented and reinforced as well as contested.

The conference will bring those various strands together in a collective reflection on the forms that authority assumed in 19th-century Ireland, on the complex relations they bore to wider British and international redefinitions of authority, and on the specificity of Irish contributions to the reshaping of authority in the modern age.

The resulting publication of selected proceedings will be an interdisciplinary volume of interest to the various fields of Irish studies as well to 19th-century historians in general. If authority seems to be in crisis in early-21st-century Ireland, it is important to bear in mind that many contested forms of authority that look ‘traditional’ from our point of view emerged from 19th-century crises and developments.

Please contact the local organizer Raphaël Ingelbien (ssnci2017@gmail.com) with any questions. 200-word abstracts or panel descriptions and a brief CV should be sent to the same address  by 15 January  2017.

There will be no registration fee. Two postgraduate travel bursaries of up to 400 euros each will be available for students without full scholarships, eligible students should send an accompanying letter about their finances together with their abstract and CV to the organizer.

More details on the SSNCI Website.

RCPI Kirkpatrick Award for history of medicine

RCPI Kirkpatrick Award for history of medicine research The Royal College of Physicians of Ireland are delighted to launch the sixth annual Kirkpatrick Award for history of medicine research. The award will be made as part of the Heritage Centre Lectures at the annual St Luke’s Symposium on Thursday 20 October 2016. The Kirkpatrick Award aims to encourage and promote the study of the history of medicine in Ireland. The award prize is €500.

The Kirkpatrick Award is open to all researchers in the field of the history of medicine in Ireland, as well as related social and cultural history fields. The purpose of the award is to support and develop the study of the history of medicine in Ireland and to promote the use of the library, archive and heritage item collections held by RCPI.

Applicants are asked to submit an abstract based on their research (maximum 800 words) with a copy of their CV, by Friday 9 September 2016. Research must be unpublished and must have been undertaken in the last three years. Research that has been submitted for publication will be considered, but details should be given of when and where it has been submitted, and if it has been accepted for publication.

A judging process will commence in September which will conclude with finalists presenting their 15 minute research papers on Thursday 20 October 2016. Please contact heritagecentre@rcpi.ie with any questions or to submit your application.

CFP: Edited volume on Science, Technology, and 20th-century Irish Literature

Submissions are welcomed for a volume focused on science, technology, and Irish literature of the revival and modernist period. The deadline for initial proposals is August 15th.

About the volume
Since W. B. Yeats infamously wrote in 1890 that “the man of science is too often a person who has exchanged his soul for a formula,” the anti-scientific and Luddite bent of the Irish literary and cultural revival has often been taken as a given.  Recent scholarship, however, has questioned this perspective and has begun to tease out a more complicated vision of Irish writers’ relationship to scientific and technological development. This collection seeks to provide a more nuanced view of Irish writers’ engagement with science and technology as well as the relationship between Irish revival writers and Irish modernism. It aims to capture not only the varied ways that Irish writers were plugged into the scientific and technological impulses and networks of the age but also the myriad outcomes of their representations – the ways that they shaped modern Irish attitudes, aesthetics, ideologies, and more.

Submission details
We welcome submissions on canonical and non-canonical authors, as well as those that interpret the category of “literature” in new ways. We also welcome submissions from both emerging and established scholars.

More Information from British Association for Modernist Studies

How to submit
The editors seek 250-500 word proposals for original contributions and a 100-word biography (included selected publications) by August 15, 2016.

Please copy all editors:
Kathryn Conrad, kconrad@ku.edu
Cóilín Parsons, Coilin.Parsons@georgetown.edu
Julie McCormick Weng, mccormi5@illinois.edu

Reminder: Call for Papers HSTM Conference

Call for Papers: Annual conference of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (HSTM) Network Ireland in association with Celsius

HSTM Network Ireland and Celsius will host this year’s conference at Dublin City University, on November 11th-12th 2016.

Professor Peter Bowler will deliver the keynote address entitled ‘Prophets of Progress?: Predicting the future of science and technology from H. G. Wells to Isaac Asimov’.

The meeting will bring together researchers across disciplines in the sciences, humanities and social sciences. We welcome proposals of papers addressing science, technology and medicine in the context of history, society, culture, ethics or the law. Papers do not necessarily need to be historical nor do they need to have Ireland as their subject. Proposals of thematic sessions and roundtables are also welcome.

Individual papers will be twenty minutes in duration, with an additional ten minutes for questions and answers. To propose a paper please send a 200 word abstract by email to hstmnetworkireland@gmail.com with the subject line ‘conference abstract’. Session proposals should include a short abstract on the session as a whole as well as individual paper abstracts (c. 100 words). The deadline for abstracts is Monday, 17 April, 2016.