Updated HSTM Network Conference Programme

The conference will take place on the St Patrick’s Campus (formerly St Patrick’s College) of Dublin City University.  Registration will be at the entrance near reception.  If you wish to attend you are kindly requested to register in advance via Eventbrite. Continue reading “Updated HSTM Network Conference Programme”

Medicine and Pharmacy in 19th Century Ireland

Apothecaries Hall of Dublin, Established 1791 

Charles Lucas Memorial Lecture in the History of Medicine and Therapeutics

As part of St Luke’s Day Symposium

Thursday 20th October, 10 am

The Heritage Centre, RCPI, Kildare Street.

Please register at www.rcpi.ie/stlukes2016

Medicine and Pharmacy in 19th Century Ireland: From Doctoring in the Dark to Rational Therapeutics.

Dr Brian Cleary, Chief Pharmacist, Rotunda Hospital, Honorary Clinical Associate Professor, RCSI.

This talk will trace the development of medicine and pharmacy during the 19th century from the early materia medica based predominantly on pre-scientific humoral models to rational therapeutics with the introduction of novel medications. This progress will be traced from the viewpoint of key local and international figures in 19th century medicine and case based presentations on the increasing therapeutic options as the century progressed

Ears, Noses, Throats and Irish Independence | Lecture

Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland, History of Medicine Section (jointly with the RCSI)

presents:

Ears, Noses, Throats and Irish Independence

Wednesday 26th October 2016 6.15pm
First Floor, Setanta House,
Setanta Place, Dublin 2.

robbie-woods

Sir Robert Woods, the first surgeon in Ireland to specialise solely in ENT, had an illustrious career which included presidency of the Royal College of Surgeons and receiving a knighthood. He became politicised during the Great War, being elected a Unionist Member of Parliament, and was involved in Anglo-Irish negotiations during secession. Woods’ protégé, Oliver St John Gogarty, not only established a successful ENT practice, but became a renowned author and poet, and was famous for his flamboyant theatrics in the operating room. He was a staunch Republican and Sinn Féiner who became a Senator in the fledgling Irish Free State.

All Welcome, particularly students.

One Month to the HSTM Network Conference 2016!

We are counting down the days until the 2016 HSTM Network Ireland annual conference on the 11th and 12th of November in Dublin City University.

Register now through Eventbrite to guarantee your place.

There are numerous talks to get excited about all detailed on our conference programme. We’re especially excited about our two key note addresses by Peter Bowler (Queen’s University, Belfast) and Maja Horst (University of Cophenhagen).

HSTM Conference Registration Open

Registration is now open for the HSTM Network Ireland annual conference to be held at Dublin City University in Dublin, Ireland on 11 and 12 November.

The programme is diverse and international and includes two key note addresses.  Peter Bowler (Queen’s University, Belfast) will speak on ‘Prophets of progress? Predicting the future of science and technology from H. G. Wells to Isaac Asimov’.  Maja Horst (University of Cophenhagen) will speak on science and social responsibility.

Registration is through Eventbrite

Further details about the conference programme and the network can be found here

HSTM Conference 2016 Programme

History of Science Technology and Medicine Network Ireland logo

HSTM ANNUAL CONFERENCE

 DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY

  11&12 NOVEMBER 2016

Download your copy here

FRIDAY

9-10am: registration

10am-11am: Session 1

Session 1A: Soviet science

Konstantin Kiprijanov, ‘Chaos and beauty in a beaker.  The early history of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction’

Elena Sinelnikova, ‘Scientific societies vs. research institutes in the first decade of Soviet power’

Session 1B: Early modern medicine

Richard Bellis, ‘A statue engraved in flesh: allusions to the Belvedere torso in Andreas Vesalius’s De humani corporis fabrica (1543) and William Hunter’s The anatomy of the human gravid uterus (1774)

Fabrizio Bigotti, ‘Santorio’s “method to avoid all errors” (1603): quantification and experimentation in early modern medicine

11am-11:30am: TEA

11:30-1:30 pm: Session 2

Session 2A: State science

Veronica McDermott, ‘The evolution of natural science policy in Ireland: a “small state” story’

Ágota Ábrán, ‘Growing plant medicines in the socialist ruins of Romania’

Adrian James Kirwan, ‘The role of telegraphy in the governance and administration of Ireland, c. 1850-1890’

Rory Mawhinney, ‘From Port to Plantation: the geographies of the 1919 British Eclipse Expeditions’

Session 2B: Definitions and their impacts in medicine

Maëlle Duchemin-Pelletier, ‘Still birth is still death’

David Kilgannon, ‘”One class of people who have been neglected”: legislating for the disabled in Ireland, 1948-57’

Harry Quinn Schone, ‘Testing Hacking’s looping effect through discussion with fibromyalgia patients’

Sira Grosso, ‘What is reasonable and what can be proved as reasonable in the realm of medical malpractice claims’

1:30pm-2.30pm: LUNCH 

 and HSTM Objects discussion panel (TBC)

2.30-4pm Session 3

Session 3A: Science fictions, science futures

Sam Robinson, ‘New Worlds: popularising science in Post-War science fiction magazines’

Mat Paskins, ‘Voices prophesying everything: techno-scientific futures in the twentieth-century periodical’

Paula Murphy, ‘”This endless space between the words”: Spike Jonze’s Her

Session 3B:  Interactions between psychiatry and general medicine

Laura Sellers, ‘Psychiatry and criminality in the late nineteenth-century prison’

Coreen McGuire, ‘Hysterical deafness and malingering in the First World War: the conflict between psychiatry and otology’

Kevin Jones, ‘Beyond the institution: British psychiatry during the inter-war period’

4pm-4.30pm TEA

4.30pm-6pm Session 4

Session 4A: Haematology, oncology, and dentistry

Clifford S. Pukel, ‘Historical revisionism in the history of cancer immunology: the tale of William Coley and Lloyd Old’

Kevin Knowles, ‘Examining sociocultural interactions that impact oral health in the 19th C United States’

Shaun R. McCann, ‘From Herodotus to HIV’

Session 4B: Fevers and epidemics

Philomena Gorey, ‘Puerperal fever in Dublin.  The case of the Rotunda Lying-In Hospital’

Patricia Marsh, ‘”Risks from shellfish—watch what you eat”: theories on the spread of typhoid fever in Belfast in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century’

Margaret Buckley, ‘Childhood epidemics in Limerick City, 1880-1890’

6:15 KEYNOTE, Prof. Peter Bowler, Queen’s University, Belfast

‘Prophets of progress?: Predicting the future of science and technology from H. G. Wells to Isaac Asimov’

SATURDAY

9-11am: Session 5

Session 5A: Communicating, translating and transmitting scientific ideas

Gary Finnegan, ‘#VaccinesWork: communicating Jenner’s legacy’

Simon Whitehouse, ‘Rand McNally’s geophysical glob: how the earth was depicted during the early Space Age’

Diarmid Finnegan, ‘Reason’s rhetor: Thomas Henry Huxley in America’

Alberto Bardi, ‘Astronomical knowledge in late Byzantium’

Session 5B: Sex, drugs, and humanity

Jennifer Brosnan, ‘The sexual education of medical students during the mid-nineteenth century: euphemism, nether regions, and banter’

Christopher Cavin, ‘Promoting “bonding and comradeship”: cultures of military intoxication in the past and present’

Ciaran McCabe, ‘Humane societies in Ireland and the transatlantic world’

11:00-11:30am: TEA

11:30-1.00pm: KEYNOTE: Maja Horst, University of Copenhagen

Title TBC, topic on the social responsibility of science

1.00-2:30pm  LUNCH

 and an introduction to Irish content on Wikipedia with Rebecca O’Neill (Hull), bring your laptop and your lunch and learn how to add/modify entries

2:30-4:30 Session 6

Session 6A: Evolutionary ideas in science and medicine

Max Meulendijks, ‘A Darwinian medicine at the Purdysburn Villa Colony: William Graham on evolution, insanity, and degeneration in the Ulster context’

Emily Herring, ‘The reception of Henri Bergson in Britain: a new interpretation of the early career of Julian Huxley’

Ciarán Walsh, ‘The skeleton in the cupboard: unpacking the Ethnographic Survey of Great Britain (Ireland) 1891-1903’

John P. Jackson, Jr., ‘Population genetics, psychometrics, and the definition of race’

Wellcome Seed awards in humanities and social science

 

Seed Awards help researchers develop compelling and innovative ideas that may go on to form part of larger grant applications.

Level of funding:

£25,000 to £50,000

Duration of funding:

6 to 12 months

Eligibility

You can apply for a Seed Award as an individual or as part of a group. You must have a PhD or the equivalent professional experience.

You must be based at an eligible host organisation in the UK, Republic of Ireland or a low- or middle-income country (although collaborators can be based elsewhere).

Go to the World Bank website to see a list of low- and middle-income countries.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply if you:

  • currently hold a Seed Award (although you can apply for more in the future)
  • have another Wellcome Trust award, with two or more years remaining, or 18 months if it’s a fellowship
  • are currently undertaking a Master’s or a PhD
  • want support for an existing, rather than a new, research project
  • have a discrete project, with no follow-on plans.

What we’re looking for

We’re looking for proposals that aim to develop new approaches or collaborations in the humanities and social sciences and enrich our understanding of human and animal health. Activities can include:

  • pilot and scoping studies
  • planning sessions
  • meetings of collaborative networks.

We encourage applications for interdisciplinary research across our Humanities and Social Science, Science, and Innovations funding.

 Full application deadline

  • 27 September 2016 (was 5 August 2016)

For More Information Please visit the Wellcome Trust Seed Awards Website